BOOK AN APPOINTMENT WITH AN IT SPECIALIST TODAY

10 Jan 2020

AA20-010A: Continued Exploitation of Pulse Secure VPN Vulnerability

Original release date: January 10, 2020 | Last revised: April 15, 2020

Summary

Unpatched Pulse Secure VPN servers continue to be an attractive target for malicious actors. Affected organizations that have not applied the software patch to fix an arbitrary file reading vulnerability, known as CVE-2019-11510, can become compromised in an attack. [1]

Although Pulse Secure [2] disclosed the vulnerability and provided software patches for the various affected products in April 2019, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) continues to observe wide exploitation of CVE-2019-11510. [3] [4] [5]

CISA expects to see continued attacks exploiting unpatched Pulse Secure VPN environments and strongly urges users and administrators to upgrade to the corresponding fixes. [6]

Timelines of Specific Events

  • April 24, 2019 – Pulse Secure releases initial advisory and software updates addressing multiple vulnerabilities.
  • May 28, 2019 – Large commercial vendors get reports of vulnerable VPN through HackerOne.
  • July 31, 2019 – Full use of exploit demonstrated using the admin session hash to get complete shell.
  • August 8, 2019 – Meh Chang and Orange Tsai demonstrate the VPN issues across multiple vendors (Pulse Secure) with detailed attack on active VPN exploitation.
  • August 24, 2019 – Bad Packets identifies over 14,500 vulnerable VPN servers globally still unpatched and in need of an upgrade.
  • October 7, 2019 – The National Security Agency (NSA) produces a Cybersecurity Advisory on Pulse Secure and other VPN products being targeted actively by advanced persistent threat actors.
  • October 16, 2019 – The CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC) releases Vulnerability Note VU#927237: Pulse Secure VPN contains multiple vulnerabilities.
  • January 2020 – Media reports cybercriminals now targeting unpatched Pulse Secure VPN servers to install REvil (Sodinokibi) ransomware.   

Technical Details

Impact

A remote, unauthenticated attacker may be able to compromise a vulnerable VPN server. The attacker may be able to gain access to all active users and their plain-text credentials. It may also be possible for the attacker to execute arbitrary commands on each VPN client as it successfully connects to the VPN server.

Affected versions:

  • Pulse Connect Secure 9.0R1 – 9.0R3.3
  • Pulse Connect Secure 8.3R1 – 8.3R7
  • Pulse Connect Secure 8.2R1 – 8.2R12
  • Pulse Connect Secure 8.1R1 – 8.1R15
  • Pulse Policy Secure 9.0R1 – 9.0R3.1
  • Pulse Policy Secure 5.4R1 – 5.4R7
  • Pulse Policy Secure 5.3R1 – 5.3R12
  • Pulse Policy Secure 5.2R1 – 5.2R12
  • Pulse Policy Secure 5.1R1 – 5.1R15

Mitigations

This vulnerability has no viable workarounds except for applying the patches provided by the vendor and performing required system updates.

CISA strongly urges users and administrators to upgrade to the corresponding fixes. [7]

References

Revisions

  • January 10, 2020: Initial Version
  • April 15, 2020: Revised to correct type of vulnerability

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

More Like This

Apple Notes Tips

Apple Notes Tips With the dawn of the new year, January is the perfect time to get your to-do list in order. But these days, most people’s lists are complicated agendas full of work and personal items, multiple schedules, and seemingly endless tasks. To keep things straight, one thing that can help is a savvy …

Apple Notes Tips Read More »

Read More

AA22-011A: Understanding and Mitigating Russian State-Sponsored Cyber Threats to U.S. Critical Infrastructure

Original release date: January 11, 2022 Summary Actions Critical Infrastructure Organizations Should Implement to Immediately Strengthen Their Cyber Posture. • Patch all systems. Prioritize patching known exploited vulnerabilities. • Implement multi-factor authentication. • Use antivirus software. • Develop internal contact lists and surge support. Note: this advisory uses the MITRE Adversarial Tactics, Techniques, and Common Knowledge …

AA22-011A: Understanding and Mitigating Russian State-Sponsored Cyber Threats to U.S. Critical Infrastructure Read More »

Read More

11 Unexpected Ways to Manage Chromebook Files

11 Unexpected Ways to Manage Chromebook Files Chromebooks have been around for over a decade now, but at the beginning, they weren’t intended for file management, with the original Chromebooks not even having a Files app. Copying or moving data, finding files or wirelessly transferring and syncing files with other systems was virtually impossible. But …

11 Unexpected Ways to Manage Chromebook Files Read More »

Read More

AA21-356A: Mitigating Log4Shell and Other Log4j-Related Vulnerabilities

Original release date: December 22, 2021 Summary The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), National Security Agency (NSA), Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC), Canadian Centre for Cyber Security (CCCS), the Computer Emergency Response Team New Zealand (CERT NZ), the New Zealand National Cyber Security Centre (NZ NCSC), and the …

AA21-356A: Mitigating Log4Shell and Other Log4j-Related Vulnerabilities Read More »

Read More

What Are Workers’ Rights in the Face of Employee Monitoring?

What Are Workers’ Rights in the Face of Employee Monitoring? As the use of technology in our everyday lives continues to increase, it’s no surprise that any legislation surrounding that technology is constantly lagging behind. After all, it’s usually impossible to know the potential dangers of technology until damage has been done. Fortunately, legislation usually …

What Are Workers’ Rights in the Face of Employee Monitoring? Read More »

Read More

Can Technology Reverse the Workforce – Depleting ‘Great Resignation’ of 2021?

Can Technology Reverse the Workforce – Depleting ‘Great Resignation’ of 2021? Although remote and other technology appears to be an underlying cause of the 2021 “Great Resignation,” it may also hold the key to a“Great Return.” Many believed the mass exodus from the workforce had peaked in April when a total of 24 million had …

Can Technology Reverse the Workforce – Depleting ‘Great Resignation’ of 2021? Read More »

Read More